Another issue out.

We (TM and E) have just released the latest issue of NEAT.

We’re loving watching the magazine grow and develop. If you love this magazine too, share the link to our site with friends and family, especially if you’re one of our amazing contributors.

Show off a bit!

 

#neatingout

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TM’s Note on Professionalism

First and foremost, to get published, you must have interesting, polished work that follows the theme and aesthetic of wherever you’re submitting. Even though the rest of the tips I’ll include here are important, that tip is the most important. I don’t think I have to explain why.

 

Second, I’ve said it once and I’ll say it again. Polish your work. If an editor has to make more than two, maybe three, grammatical or spelling corrections in your story (poetry gets more leeway if there’s an intention behind the change), then your work will probably be rejected.

 

Third, look at the magazine’s guidelines for how they want the submission to look and actually follow them. This is where an editor can see the difference between a professional writer and an amateur. Don’t get me wrong, E and I love getting work from new writers, however, we both are unimpressed by unprofessional emails and unprofessional submissions.

 

What is an unprofessional email, you might ask?

An email:

-without a subject in the subject bar

-where the name of the writer and the name attached to the email address, or the email address itself, are different; this is fine if you include a line about publishing under a penname and the editors know which name you plan to use

-without a bio—at least glance at bios from past issues (this is another area that’s a dead giveaway on whether or not a writer has looked at the magazine before)

-that’s in a funky font—keep it simple and unobtrusive

 

That’s really what it comes down to. Editors, usually, are forgiving if you forget an attachment or make a mistake on some other element of this process, but don’t make it a regular habit and remember that the editor doesn’t enjoy rejecting a writer’s work any more than the writer him/herself enjoys being rejected.

 

Basically, your job, as the writer, is to send in work that’s impossible to reject—start with the work itself, then look at how you’re presenting it to a magazine.

 

I wish you well!

 

-TM

Fall 2014 is LIVE!

Our nocturne issue has reached its crescendo and is now available for reading. We can’t wait to hear your thoughts and impressions on this one.

Three things:

1.) As always, our interviews the highlighted writers are up on TMI and Liz’s Pick. This quarter, we featured Fred Zirm and Courtney Denning.

2.) We decided that with this issue, we would solicit book reviews. There are three at the end of the issue: Tomorrowland by Joseph Bates, Fall Love by contributor Anne Whitehouse, and Honeyvoiced by contributor Jordi Alonso. We hope the reviews will spur you to read these books!

3.) Our Winter 2014-2015 Call for Submissions is also up. The theme: dirge. Give us something dark and worthy of the name.

Keep it NEAT.

TM & Liz

Update from TM

NEAT Post card Dec 2014

Liz and I are having our second meeting for the Fall 2014 issue today! We’re finalizing the issue, so in the next few days be on the look out for the announcement that the issue has been published.

In the meantime, Liz and I plan to drop these postcards off at coffee shops and libraries around Cincinnati. If you find one, feel free to grab it — and we’d love for you to tweet at us with a picture or comment on where you found the postcard! (@NEATmag)

If you don’t live in the area, email us (neatmag@gmail.com) and we’d be happy to send some your way.

Keep it neat.

Submissions Closed

As they say: that’s a wrap! As people who love music and art, we can’t wait to read your nocturne submissions. If you submitted, we will get back to you in the next two weeks or so. In the meantime, check out the summer issue to remind you of warmer times.

Keep it NEAT.
Liz & TM